Sunglasses don’t just make you look good, they’re incredibly important in preserving the overall health of your eyes.
The eyes are extremely delicate and susceptible to disease and injury, just like any other part of the body.

Quality sunglasses are a necessary and important protection tool. Here we tell you how UV sun rays can cause eye diseases and how a pair of sunglasses can keep your eyes healthy.

Sunlight can cause serious eye diseases

You have to protect your skin from UV rays and your eyes are no different. Solar radiation has fatal consequences for our corneas and retinas. If too much unfiltered sunlight reaches your eyes, your eyes are no different. Solar radiation has fatal consequences for our corneas and retinas. If too much unfiltered sunlight reaches the eyes, especially at a young age, it can lead to serious diseases such as blindness and cancer, among others.

Sunglasses can help the eyes recover

Sunlight and pollution can be detrimental to healing after corrective eye procedures and cataract surgeries. Just like putting a Band-Aid over a scratch to keep out dirt and germs, sunglasses act as a shield to promote a quick and smooth recovery after eye procedures.

Sunglasses protect the eyes from the elements

We know that it is important to wear sunglasses on sunny days, but it is also essential to wear them every day, even when it is cloudy.

Situations such as snow reflect 80% of the sun’s UV rays and can cause a condition known as snow blindness. In this case, the reflected sun’s glare burns the cornea (corneal burn).

The wind can dry and irritate the eyes at any time of the year. It also kicks up sand and dust. This can irritate the eyes, but it can also damage them and lead to further discomfort and problems.

Considerations for buying sunglasses

Not all sunglasses are created equal. Whether they are vintage, cheap, expensive or polarized, they may or may not protect your eyes adequately, which is why it is important to choose quality sunglasses with UV protection. Most brands indicate UV protection on their label. Look for a label that says “100% protection against UVA and UVB rays” so you will be protecting your eyes correctly.